Tag Archives: brooch jewelry

Michelle Obama Jewelry Update

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It’s been a while since Michelle Obama’s jewelry dominated the posts of this blingy chronical of all things shiny, but I’m happy to report that our Fashionista-In-Chief is back with some serious jaw-droppers for your gawking pleasure.

(A tip of the hat to the Mrs. O blog for their diligent chronicling of our First Lady’s fashion.)

The Brooch Is Back!

 

Michelle Obama met Kate Middleton and her in-laws in her signature brooch bling – this one a 1940s Hobe brooch from the House of Lavande.

And this sparkler a pink vintage Henry Schreiner brooch – also from House of Lavande.

 

Tom Binns Goes to Washington

 

I’ve always been a fan of Tom Binns’ wild and whimsical designs, but I was surprised to see our First Lady embrace his eccentric stylings not just for this dinner she and the Pres. hosted for the Queen of England – but on other occasions as well.

Pearl strands are fine and all – -but THIS is Jewelry! (Her ring is a jade and diamond lattice piece by Yewn)

Mrs. O Channels Jackie O!

 

Our Commander in Chic wore this classic Tom Ford gown with dangling diamond earrings (designer unknown) to Buckingham Palace for a formal state dinner. Elegance personified. Somewhere Jackie O is smiling.

 

While the pearl strand will forever by synomymous with First Lady Fashion, I’m thrilled to see such variety in her jewelry selections.

What are your favorite looks?

Blingy Butterfly Gets The Royal Treatment

Now that the jewelry-barren landscape that was New York Fashion Week is behind me, it’s time to get back to blingy basics. And there’s no better way to celebrate than by ogling this bodacious butterfly bauble that just joined the storied coffers of the Smithsonian Institution.

Designed by Cindy Chao, the “Royal Butterfly” is a three-dimensional diamond-and gemstone-studded brooch that took over two years to create. The design is balanced by four large rough diamond slices and includes more than 20 color gradients comprised of 2,318 colorless and colored diamonds, color-changing sapphires, colored sapphires, rubies and tsavorites.

Color-changing sapphires? Awesome.
Chao generously gifted her “Royal Butterfly” to the Smithsonian, which now lives with some of the world’s most significant jewels, including the famous Hope Diamond.

The designer’s ‘hope’ was not only for viewers to appreciate the art in a new medium, but that it would also inspire “people to dream and create” and “continue to contribute to the evolution of culture and the world around them.”

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Ms. Chao? You had me at ‘color-changing sapphires’.

And if you’re hunkering for more Smithsonian sparkle, they just launched a branded jewelry line with QVC based on many of the pieces in their treasure chest. Check out Jewelry.com for more.

The Jewelry Insider

September 30, 2009

 


If Michelle Obama is ushering in a new era of power brooch diplomacy, she wouldn’t be the first. Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, a tenacious negotiator, loved to communicate her mood and intentions through her brooches, and now the Museum of Arts & Design in New York will exhibit 200 of her favorites.

Albright “found that what she wore and how she presented herself had a lot of interpretive meaning to those she was with,” said Holly Hotchner, the museum’s director. “The pins became an added way that she communicated as secretary of state.”

“Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection,” scheduled to open today, comes 10 years after the museum presented “Brooching It Diplomatically,” a show of pins created by contemporary artists inspired by the ones Albright wore.

“She started acquiring pins because of their inherent messages, their whimsical and pictorial quality,” said David Revere McFadden, the museum’s chief curator. “It’s not about jewels and gems, it’s about jewelry as a communication device.”

The collection is diverse, ranging from Americana styles — including flags and eagles — to ones with flora, fauna and insect themes. She always brought a selection with her on her travels so she could be ready for any situation.

For instance, Albright chose to wear a bee pinwhenever she felt talks amounted to “something like a sting,” McFadden said.

“It’s a very gentle way of saying to whomever she is speaking to: ‘Listen carefully because I’m kind of telling you where I think this conversation is going,”‘ he said.

When she thought negotiations would likely go well, she would wear a balloon pin. Another pin, made of stainless steel, shows the head of Lady Liberty with two watch faces for eyes, one of which is upside down. The pin allows both her and others to check the time.

I wonder how many times Albright said the word ‘pinhead’ during the Bush administration?

The exhibition, running from Sept. 30 though Jan. 31, 2010, will be accompanied by a book, “Read My Pins: Stories from a Diplomat’s Jewel Box,” written by Albright.

 

The Jewelry Insider

April 8, 2009


If Michelle Obama is ushering in a new era of power brooch diplomacy, she wouldn’t be the first. Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, a tenacious negotiator, loved to communicate her mood and intentions through her brooches, and now the Museum of Arts & Design in New York will exhibit 200 of her favorites.

Albright “found that what she wore and how she presented herself had a lot of interpretive meaning to those she was with,” said Holly Hotchner, the museum’s director. “The pins became an added way that she communicated as secretary of state.”

“Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection,” scheduled to open in September, comes 10 years after the museum presented “Brooching It Diplomatically,” a show of pins created by contemporary artists inspired by the ones Albright wore.

“She started acquiring pins because of their inherent messages, their whimsical and pictorial quality,” said David Revere McFadden, the museum’s chief curator. “It’s not about jewels and gems, it’s about jewelry as a communication device.”

The collection is diverse, ranging from Americana styles — including flags and eagles — to ones with flora, fauna and insect themes. She always brought a selection with her on her travels so she could be ready for any situation.

For instance, Albright chose to wear a bee pin whenever she felt talks amounted to “something like a sting,” McFadden said.

“It’s a very gentle way of saying to whomever she is speaking to: ‘Listen carefully because I’m kind of telling you where I think this conversation is going,”‘ he said.

When she thought negotiations would likely go well, she would wear a balloon pin. Another pin, made of stainless steel, shows the head of Lady Liberty with two watch faces for eyes, one of which is upside down. The pin allows both her and others to check the time.

I wonder how many times Albright said the word ‘pinhead’ during the Bush administration?

The exhibition, running from Sept. 30 though Jan. 31, 2010, will be accompanied by a book, “Read My Pins: Stories from a Diplomat’s Jewel Box,” written by Albright.