Tag Archives: Gemstone

‘Tis the season for coats and jackets, hats and scarves, and most importantly, December’s icy birthstone, blue topaz! Here’s a fun little fact about this blue-hued gem, that seems more than appropriate for the holiday season – blue topaz is a symbol of eternal love.

Gift your loved ones (or yourself) with blue topaz, and check out the collection at Jewelry.com!

Fun Facts About Summer’s Hottest Stone, Morganite

Summer, summer, summertime, time to sit back and unwind (we’re taking it back a notch to some 1990’s Will Smith!). There’s no better way to unwind and celebrate summer than with the season’s hottest stone morganite. This gorgeous peachy-pink stone is the perfect addition to any summer outfit.

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Here are a few fun facts about morganite.

Morganite is the peachy-pink version of beryl.

– George F. Kunz, chief gemologist at Tiffany & Co., named morganite in honor of J.P. Morgan. Prior to the stone’s renaming in 1911, it was called pink beryl.

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Morganite is also referred to as pink emerald.

Morganite is known as a healing stone, and promotes confidence and peace.

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Morganite helps to bring love into your life (and who doesn’t want that?).

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Shop our morganite collection and let that peace and love flow into your life this summer!

 

 

The Jewelry Insider

June 1, 2010

Love the Look: Amethyst Earrings

Perhaps no gemstone has been as prized throughout history as amethyst. Purple has long been considered a royal color so it is not surprising that amethyst has been so much in demand during history. Even Leonardo Da Vinci wrote that amethyst was able to dissipate evil thoughts and quicken the intelligence, making an amethyst pair of earrings a perfect gift for the perfect someone.

Amethyst earrings are becoming today’s latest fashion trend by adding a dash of color to your outfit. Whether you’re wearing a pair of jeans and a simple T-shirt, an every day business suit, or a glamorous evening gown, a pair of amethyst earrings will upgrade your look and accentuate your looks.

So choose from our wide selection of stunning amethyst earrings, from radiant purple stud earrings and dazzling drop earrings to exotic amethyst chandelier earrings and hoop earrings, finding the perfect pair of amethyst earrings has never been simpler.

Learn about Amethyst Earrings

Jewelry.com Amethyst Jewelry – The Color Of Kings

Expert Advice, Information and Shopping Tips on Amethyst Jewelry. Find out all there is to know about Amethysts and find the perfect amethyst jewelry for you.

Jewelry.com: Make Mine An Amethyst

What makes an Amethyst a gem for royalty? Find out if you’re regal enough to wear this violet jewel.

Jewelry.com: Purple Jewelry Reigns for 2009

President Obama says it’s his favorite color. It’s reputed to be the color of royalty and now it’s THE must have color trend for 2009. Find out what’s making this color a ‘must have’ for any 2009 wardrobe.

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Amethyst Drop Earrings

Amethyst Hoop Earrings

Shop Amethyst Earrings By Shape Cut

Round Cut Amethyst Earrings

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Emerald Cut Amethyst Earrings

 

The Jewelry Insider

October 21, 2008

Indulge in some guilt-free shopping this month with November’s uber-chic birthstone – citrine.

Legend speaks of the power of citrine bathing its owners in thoughts of calmness and kindness. Certainly today, a splash of calmness would go a long way.

The sunny charm of citrine brightens almost any jewelry style making it the perfect gem to brighten the rather dour world of 2008. Citrine, a form of quartz, derives its name from the French word for lemon, ‘citron’. Many people have come to know this stone though under the name gold topaz, or Madeira or Spanish topaz, although in actual fact it has very little in common with topaz – except for a few nuances of color. Citrine is a member of the large quartz family. Like all crystal quartzes citrine has a hardness of 7 on the Mohs scale and is thus, to a large extent, insensitive to scratches. It won’t immediately take offence at being knocked about either, since its cleavage properties are non-existent. Even if their refractive index is relatively low, the yellow stones have just that mellow, warm tone that seems to have captured the last glow of autumn.

There are not many yellow gemstones in the world of jewels. A diamond or a sapphire may be yellow – but are usually up there on the price scale. Tourmalines or chrysoberyl, can be found in yellow hues but these tend to be greenish-yellow. However a citrine fulfils everyone’s color wishes, from lemon yellow to reddish brown.

Rare though it is, yellow does in fact occur in quartz in nature, if seldom, when there are traces of iron in the silicon dioxide. Historically, it has been found in Spain, on the Scottish island of Arran, in France, Hungary and in several mines overseas. Perhaps the citrine wouldn’t have been talked about at all if, in the middle of the 18th century, it had not been for the discovery that amethysts and smoky quartzes can also be rendered yellow by so-called burning. This heat treatment at temperatures of between 470 and 560 degrees has to be carried out very carefully and requires a great deal of experience. However, in the course of 200 years, its application has become so much a matter of course that most of the stones available in the trade today are in fact burnt amethysts or smoky quartzes. Only a trained specialist can recognize the signs of heat treatment at all, burnt stones having subtle stripes whilst the yellow of natural ones is cloudy.

In Europe, the boom on these yellow to reddish crystal quartzes didn’t begin until, in the 1930s, expatriate agate cutters from Idar-Oberstein, Germany sent large quantities of citrine back home, along with amethyst and agate, from Brazil and Uruguay. It was only then the spells of citrine began to be felt worldwide.

In the 1930s the world was in turmoil and the color and value of citrine made it one of the most popular gems on the market. Today history seems to be repeating itself. Looking at the trends of fashion – citrine is on its way back as a stylish super-star that won’t break the bank.

More Jewelry News

The Jewelry Insider

July 16, 2008

Find out the whys, whats, wheres and worth of July’s red-hot birthstone – a rocking ruby.

RubyThere’s a saying that the ‘price of wisdom is above rubies’. That is certainly true, but hey, you can’t wear wisdom on your finger or around your neck. Ok – so wisdom is probably somewhat more useful than a ruby or two – but this saying just goes to show how highly prized these little red gems have been throughout history.

In England for example, the gold coronation crown of kings (and queens) contains a large, tablet-cut ruby on which the figure of St. George’s cross is engraved. What very well could be the world’s largest gem ruby is tucked away in Czech – also in a royal crown. The 250 carater rocking ruby is set in the St Wenceslas Crown that is hidden behind lock and key in the St. Vitus Cathederal in Prague. According to the history books, Charles IV of Luxembourg, King of Bohemia (1316-78) originally ordered the ruby for the shrine containing the skull of Saint Wenceslas. It was later set in the crown.

Rubies are symbolic of courage and bravery. Warriors were said to have implanted the gems under their skin to bring them valor in battle and make them
invincible. The stone has also been used as a talisman against danger, disaster, to stop bleeding, and a number of other ailments. Its intense color was thought to come from an undying flame inside the stone – or, as some legends would have it, a piece of the planet Mars. In Burma it was believed that rubies grew somewhat like fruit. The redder the color, the riper the ruby. A flawed ruby was considered over mature.

The finest rubies are intensely saturated, pure red with no overtones of brown or blue. After color, the factors that influence value are clarity, cut and size. Rubies that are clear with no visible inclusions are more valuable than those with visible internal flaws.

Rubies are readily available in sizes up to 2 carats, and because of their intense color and durability, they make excellent accent stones. Larger sizes can be obtained, but top-quality rubies are rarer and more valuable than colorless diamonds – particularly in sizes above 5 carats.

A 15.97-carat ruby (known as the Mogok Ruby) belonging to U.S. geologist Allan Caplan was sold at auction in New York by Sotheby’s in 1988 for $3.63 million. At $227,300 per carat, this made it the most expensive ruby in the world. It was purchased by Graff of London, who reportedly sold it to the Sultan of Brunei as an engagement ring for one of his wives.

Fortunately you don’t have to be the Sultan of Brunei to own your own ruby fruit. Make sure your July is royally red-hot with a stunning ruby rock.

More Jewelry News

The Jewelry Insider

July 16, 2008

Find out the whys, whats, wheres and worth of July’s red-hot birthstone – a rocking ruby.

RubyThere’s a saying that the ‘price of wisdom is above rubies’. That is certainly true, but hey, you can’t wear wisdom on your finger or around your neck. Ok – so wisdom is probably somewhat more useful than a ruby or two – but this saying just goes to show how highly prized these little red gems have been throughout history.

In England for example, the gold coronation crown of kings (and queens) contains a large, tablet-cut ruby on which the figure of St. George’s cross is engraved. What very well could be the world’s largest gem ruby is tucked away in Czech – also in a royal crown. The 250 carater rocking ruby is set in the St Wenceslas Crown that is hidden behind lock and key in the St. Vitus Cathederal in Prague. According to the history books, Charles IV of Luxembourg, King of Bohemia (1316-78) originally ordered the ruby for the shrine containing the skull of Saint Wenceslas. It was later set in the crown.

Rubies are symbolic of courage and bravery. Warriors were said to have implanted the gems under their skin to bring them valor in battle and make them
invincible. The stone has also been used as a talisman against danger, disaster, to stop bleeding, and a number of other ailments. Its intense color was thought to come from an undying flame inside the stone – or, as some legends would have it, a piece of the planet Mars. In Burma it was believed that rubies grew somewhat like fruit. The redder the color, the riper the ruby. A flawed ruby was considered over mature.

The finest rubies are intensely saturated, pure red with no overtones of brown or blue. After color, the factors that influence value are clarity, cut and size. Rubies that are clear with no visible inclusions are more valuable than those with visible internal flaws.

Rubies are readily available in sizes up to 2 carats, and because of their intense color and durability, they make excellent accent stones. Larger sizes can be obtained, but top-quality rubies are rarer and more valuable than colorless diamonds – particularly in sizes above 5 carats.

A 15.97-carat ruby (known as the Mogok Ruby) belonging to U.S. geologist Allan Caplan was sold at auction in New York by Sotheby’s in 1988 for $3.63 million. At $227,300 per carat, this made it the most expensive ruby in the world. It was purchased by Graff of London, who reportedly sold it to the Sultan of Brunei as an engagement ring for one of his wives.

Fortunately you don’t have to be the Sultan of Brunei to own your own ruby fruit. Make sure your July is royally red-hot with a stunning ruby rock.

More Jewelry News