Tag Archives: holiday gift ideas

The Jewelry Insider

December 29, 2010


Cocktails and jewelry – what a winning combination. As I was recently pondering what jewelry to break out for my favorite champagne-drenched holiday this Friday (wait for the Carrie Bradshaw moment…), I couldn’t help but wonder (there it is…): Why is it that jewelry and luxury libations have such a glittering partnership?

First, there’s the cocktail ring. The jewelry category emerged in the roaring 20s during Prohibition at illegal, booze-filled ‘cocktail’ parties. Women went big with fashion statements at these underground soirees, flashing their oversized, colorful baubles along with their newly exposed knee caps.

Cocktail rings generally have an oversized center stone of 3 carats or more and are typically worn on the right hand (any finger will do). But as we jewelry hounds know, there are plenty of costume options out there that won’t break the bank.

But there’s another drinkable jewelry look emerging from the shadows lately – champagne diamonds. From light champagnes, to burnished browns and rich cognacs, these natural diamonds offer a selection of tones and hues to compliment every style, taste and tolerance level.

An informative piece in the New York Times reports that the stone made its debut in the late 1990s when it was discovered in Rio Tinto’s Argyle mine in Australia, but is only now gaining a strong following – including from yours truly and a bevy of Hollywood’s leading ladies.


If you really want to tie one on, how about a double shot with a champagne diamond cocktail ring like this one for almost $400 off retail? ‘Tis the season!

And be sure to check out the champagne diamond treasure chest on Jewelry.com for more bubbly bling – it’s jewelry that’s perfect for teetotalers and the tipsy alike!

The Jewelry Insider

December 10, 2009


Blue Topaz is December’s birthstone and one of the more popular colored gemstones on the market today. Find out more about this cool creation and slip some well-informed hints to the gift givers in your life.

BLUE TOPAZ FACTS AND FLAIR:

Blue topaz has become one of the most popular gemstones on the market today, due to its clarity, durability, availability and affordable cost. Yet it is a shade of topaz rarely found in nature. The stone’s watery blue color is most often created through a combination of heat treatment and irradiation.

Topaz is one of the well-known pegmatite minerals that also includes beryl and tourmaline. Blue topaz is the birthstone for December – and is also the recommended gemstone for couples celebrating their fourth wedding anniversary.

 

Most blue topaz starts life as a colorless or slightly tinted topaz from places like Brazil, Mexico, Nigeria, Sri Lanka and China. It is then irradiated (to incite the color change) and heated (to stabilize the change). The result is a permanent aqua shade. Despite the stone’s exposure to irradiation, experts say it poses no health hazard whatsoever to the wearer.

Topaz holds the distinction of being the gemstone thought to have the widest rage of curative powers. According to legend, the stone can dispel enchantment and improve the eyesight. The ancient Greeks believed that it had the power to increase strength and make its wearer invisible in times of emergency. Topaz is also said to change color in the presence of poisoned food or drink.

With a ranking of “8” on the Mohs scale of hardness, blue topaz is exceptionally strong and durable and well-suited to everyday wear. However, it should be protected against hard blows that can split, crack or chip it.

Shop Blue Topaz on Jewelry.com

The Jewelry Insider

December 9, 2009


Breaking news: Rudolph apparently has a nose for the jewelry business.

Jewelry lovers who are hoping for, say, a nice tasteful pair of diamond studs or an inexpensive gemstone piece for the holidays this year might be disappointed to find a lovely pendant made out of that rarest of materials – reindeer dung – under the tree instead.

Yup. Sparkly reindeer-dung necklaces are indeed on sale at an Illinois zoo that hopes to attract the same holiday shoppers who swept up their dung Christmas ornaments last year. The limited-edition Magical Reindeer Gem contains dried, sterilized reindeer droppings — sprayed with glitter (of course) — on a beaded chain. They’ll be available at the Bloomington zoo’s gift shop for $15, or by mail for $20.

Miller Park Zoological Society spokeswoman Susie Ohley told the Chicago Tribune that while ‘silly’, she estimates the zoo could make as much as $16,500 – a welcome windfall since they lost $200,000 under city budget cuts this year.

Stop ‘taking crap’ and sell it instead – not a bad business plan.

What do you guys think? Would you wear jewelry made from Dancer’s droppings? Or are you strictly a dung-less consumer?

The Jewelry Insider

December 7, 2009

As promised, jewelry hounds, I am continuing coverage of my new favorite gemstone – champagne diamonds – a positively glittering new jewelry trend that’s sure to have staying power well into the bubbly New Year and beyond!


Tired of the same old same old? Champagne diamonds not only offer up the glam, they give you something different from the natural diamond color wheel when accessorizing for the season. Red carpets and runways have already taken to the sparkling stone, and Jewelry.com just curated a cool collection of the cognac-colored gems just ripe for the picking.

Most of the world’s supply of champagne diamonds comes from Rio Tinto’s Argyle Diamond Mine in the rugged and beautiful East Kimberley region of Western Australia.

The Australian Aborigines who are traditional owners of the land in the East Kimberley believe that the diamonds were formed when a barramundi fish escaped through a spinifex net. According to that myth, the colors of the diamonds mined from the red earth of the region come from different parts of the barramundi.

Fish or no fish, these diamond beauties have really captured me. I’m putting this champagne diamond right hand ring from Reed’s on my holiday wish list (a girl can dream, right?). Which champagne styles do you want under the tree this year?