Tag Archives: jewelry education

Shades of Gold

Let’s be honest, when it comes to both jewelry and clothing, gold will always be in style. Just take a look at the latest fall/winter 2015 runway trends during Mercedes Benz Fashion Week (MBFW) – gold had a presence! When it comes to gold, there are a number of different hues and types.

Yellow Gold – If you’re an easy-breezy, low-maintenance type of gal, then this is the gold for you. Yellow gold is the purest gold and requires the least amount of maintenance. For a brighter yellow color, look for 14K gold vs. 10K gold. For a deeper yellow color, look for 18K gold vs. 14K gold. Click here to shop for yellow gold.

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White Gold – If you’re not into yellow gold, but still want something durable and of good quality, white gold is your best bet (and one of our favorites). It’s super stylish and differs from yellow gold only in its color. White gold contains a gold and nickel, palladium, or manganese alloy, that gives it that nice silver-type coloring. Click here to shop for white gold. 

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Rose Gold – If you’re a trendy fashionista (we know you are!), then throw on some rose gold. Rose Gold gets its beautiful pinkish color through a silver, gold, and copper alloy. Click here to shop for rose gold.

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Green Gold – Dare to be different with green gold. When you think of gold, we bet green gold doesn’t usually come to mind, but it’s out there and it’s pretty! The green gold alloy is a combination of silver, copper, zinc, and yellow gold.

What’s your favorite type of gold jewelry to wear?

To learn more about gold, check out our blog post The Many Colors of Gold.

 

 

Gemstone Education: Sapphire: The Jewel of the Sky

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Jewelry.com separates the sapphire facts from the fiction in this jewelry primer for September’s glittering birthstone.

Sapphire has been sought after for thousands of years as the ultimate blue gemstone. The ancient Persians believed that the earth rested on a giant sapphire that gave its blue reflection to the sky, hence the Latin name “sapphiru”, which means blue. The gem has long symbolized faith, remembrance, and enduring commitment.

According to tradition, God gave Moses the Ten Commandments on tablets of sapphire, making it the most sacred stone. This supposed “divine favor” is why sapphires often were the gem of choice for kings and high priests throughout history. In fact, the British Crown Jewels contain a number of notable sapphires. Prince Charles even gave Princess Diana a sapphire engagement ring.

Sapphire is the birthstone for September. It is also the recommended gem for couples celebrating their fifth and 45th wedding anniversaries. Both sapphire and its sister stone, ruby, are part of the corundum family, one of the strongest minerals on earth. The stone is mined in many parts of the world, including Australia, Cambodia, China, Kashmir, Kenya, Madagascar, Myanmar, Nigeria, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Thailand, the United States and Vietnam. Sapphires from Kashmir and Myanmar are rarest and most prized because of their vivid blue, velvety look.

Although sapphire is virtually synonymous with blue, the stone also comes in a variety of fancy colors that includes colorless/white, pink, yellow, peach, orange, brown, violet, purple, green and many shades in between (except red, because a red sapphire would be called a ruby). Some sapphires that are cut into a cabochon (dome) shape even display a six-rayed white star. These are called star sapphires, and the ancients regarded them as powerful talismans that protected travelers.

Like other gemstones, color is the main determining factor when judging the value of a sapphire. As a rule, the most valuable sapphires have a medium intense, pure vivid blue color and hold the brightness of their color under any type of lighting. Any color undertones – usually black, gray or green – will reduce a stone’s value. Although a pastel stone would be less valued than a deeper blue one, it would be more valuable than a stone considered too dark.

In selecting your sapphire, keep in mind that the finest stones are “eye clean”, with little or no inclusions (flaws) visible to the naked eye. Sapphire is readily available in sizes of up to 2 carats, but gems of 5-10 carats are not unusual. The stone is most often cut in a cushion shape – a rounded rectangle – or an oval. But smaller stones are available in round brilliant cuts and a variety of fancy shapes, such as triangle, square, emerald, marquise, pear, baguette, cabochon and others.

Some of the more noted sapphires include the Logan Sapphire, a 423-carat cushion-cut stone from Sri Lanka currently in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., and a 258-carat stone set in the Russian crown and kept in the Diamond Fund in Moscow. With a hardness of 9 on the Mohs scale, sapphire is harder than any other gemstone except a diamond. This quality makes it extremely durable for everyday jewelry pieces subject to repeated impact, such as rings and bracelets.

In general, sapphire can be cleaned with soapy water or commercial solvent and a brush. It is estimated that about 90% of sapphires on the market today have been heated to maximize their color and clarity. This process is permanent and completely stable. Perfect natural, untreated gems are exceptionally rare and very expensive.

Some colorless or pale stones are treated with chemicals (diffusion treated), which improves the surface color only. This could create a problem if the stone is ever chipped or nicked and needs to be recut or repolished. In addition, some fancy colored sapphire is irradiated to give it a more intense shade. These effects are temporary and can fade in light or heat.

The Jewelry Insider

May 10, 2011

Jewelry.Com Is Your Source For Tennis Bracelet Guidance. Elegant “In-Line” Styles, Are Definitely Where It’s At This Season For Tennis Bracelets.

It’s not often that a piece of jewelry is named for an accident, but such is the case with the ever-popular Tennis Bracelet. An “in-line” diamond bracelet that featured a thin symmetrical pattern of diamonds received the fashion nom de plume of tennis bracelet owing to an incident involving professional tennis player Chris Evert during a match in 1987. Evert, the former World No. 1 woman tennis player and the winner of 18 Grand Slam singles titles, had been wearing an elegant, expensive bracelet featuring an inline string of individually set and matched diamonds made by jeweler to the stars George Bedewi. When the clasp snapped, she asked the officials to stop the match until the gems could be found. Since that day, diamond bracelets created in this style have been called tennis bracelets. The tennis bracelet incident sparked a new name a huge jewelry trend with ripples that reach all the way to today’s runways. In fact, within the sport itself, tennis bracelets continue to be worn by various tennis stars like Serena Williams and Gabriela Sabatini.

Though the match in-line style is of vintage origins (see some of the antique pieces of Trifari) the tennis bracelets of today are some of the most popular accessories for formal occasions due to their luster and sparkle. Individual diamonds (or reasonable facsimiles) are placed in square settings and then strung into a bracelet held together by a clasp. The settings and support wiring may be constructed from silver or other quality jewelry metal. Key to the tennis bracelet trend is that these individual settings allow tennis bracelets to move comfortably while worn.

Other types of jewelry that share the form of tennis bracelets are referred to as tennis-style. Groups of different sized stones may be used in tennis-style bracelets, but the jewelry retains the inline look of original tennis bracelets. Classic tennis bracelets tend to feature a uniform arrangement of diamonds and can be very expensive.

One important element of well-constructed tennis bracelets is the safety latch. The clasp of a typical tennis bracelet depends on a springy metal latch = meshing securely with a hook. Over time, this clasp style can become less reliable. Therefore, jewelry designers include a secondary security measure in tennis bracelets. The two most common styles of safety latches are chains and figure eights. These measures ensure that, even if the main clasp separates, the figure eight loops will keep tennis bracelets from falling off.

Tennis bracelets must be custom fitted for maximum security and comfort. Tennis bracelets that fit too loosely can become snagged and pulled. Overly snug tennis bracelets can chafe the skin and become stretched to the point of breakage. An ideal fit allows one finger to pass easily between the bracelet and wrist.

With today’s fashions diamond tennis bracelets reflect the trends and ideas of the formal evening wear Jewelry Zeitgeist.

Celebrity Bracelets And Bangle Trends

Jewelry Bracelets

This year’s biggest accessory comeback has been the bracelet. Whatever its form; as a bangle bracelet, a cuff, tennis or charm bracelet – discover your style with our guide to brilliant bracelets.

Jewelry.com: Diamonds and Metallics Win Big at American Music Awards

Music’s super-mavens gathered at the AMAs’ and celebrated in diamond harmony. Oversize earrings, statement necklaces and diamond cuff bracelets and bangles stole the jewelry honors at the glitzy event.

Jewelry.com: Riviera Rocks Cannes Style

It was understated glamour at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Clean lines, muted colors with plenty of ice dazzled the red-carpet at the Riviera’s red-carpet extravaganza.

Jewelry.com: Jewelry from Your Favorite Idol

American Idol’s favorite judge is designing sparkles and shines for American Idols and American fashionistas.

Jewelry.com: Elton John’s Rocks and Raves

It was a celebration of diamonds and gems at Elton John’s blinging Black and White Ball. Hollywood celebrities glammed it up at this annual ode to ice.

Celebrities Go for the Gold

Solid Gold Meets Heroin Chic

Carry the Torch with Designer Jewels

Shop Tennis Bracelet Jewelry

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Diamond Tennis Bracelets

Cubic Zirconia Tennis Bracelets

Swarovski Tennis Bracelets

Sapphire Tennis Bracelets

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Gold Tennis Bracelets

Sterling Silver Tennis Bracelets

Gold-Plated Tennis Bracelets

Quartz Earrings

Quartz Earrings- Nature’s Gift

Jewelry.com is your source for expert advice, information, and shopping tips on choosing glowing quartz earrings. From modern, sleek lemon quartz drop earrings to romantic rose quartz baguette earrings to glamorous hoops glowing with blue quartz’s dreamy beauty, quartz earrings are the ultimate accessories to compliment any style. Affordable and crafted in an incredible range of colors and styles- from the brilliant reflectivity of citrine and amethyst earrings to the opaque mistiness of clear quartz and and green quartz earrings, quartz earrings light up the wearer’s face with all the reflected beauty of nature’s gifts.

Quartz earring jewelry is found in a variety of styles, much like quartz itself, which ranges widely in texture and appearance- from sunny citrines and dazzling violet amethysts to dusk-colored smoky quartz and delicate, pale pink rose quartz. Quartz jewelry has been prized all over the world for centuries, from pre-Columbian Native American quartz jewelry to mid-19th century quartz cameos. Nowadays, quartz earrings’ unique affordability and versatility inspires artisans to create quartz earrings in an incredible range of styles. Whether you’re looking for an attention-grabbing pair of green quartz earrings or a demure pair of amethyst earrings, quartz earring jewelry is full of beautiful steals; quartz’s low cost point allows jewelry designers to create bold quartz earrings that could never be attempted with more pricey gems. Whether you’re looking for a pair of dreamy blue quartz earrings or a pair of funky, attention-grabbing citrine earrings , quartz earrings borrow nature’s beauty to give you a glow and radiance that simply cannot be outshone.

Quartz Earrings and Quartz Jewelry Trends

Jewelry.com: November’s Birthstone: The Chic Secrets of Citrine

Jewelry.com investigates the chic secrets of not-so-mellow yellow citrine.

Jewelry.com Gemstone Education: Amethyst: The Color of Kings

The history, the secrets, the legends and the truth of amazing Amethyst. This purple gem, the birthstone for February is reputedly the most ‘regal’ of all gems – find out why.

Jewelry.com: Insider Gems – New Faves

Find out the jewelry styles, the gems and the fashions that’ll be rocking the runways….

Jewelry.com: Gems In The House

If you’ve money to spare – you may want to consider some of these ‘furnishings’ such as gold toilets, diamonds in wineglasses and some very unusual uses of gems.

Jewelry.com: Purple Jewelry Reigns

President Obama says it’s his favorite color. It’s renowned as the color of royalty and now it’s THE must have color trend. Find out what’s making this color a ‘must-have’ for any wardrobe.

Green Quartz Jewelry

Get all green’s glamour- without spending all of that other green. Green quartz jewelry is blooming in beauty!

Rose Quartz Jewelry

Romantic rose quartz jewelry marries vintage charm and modern elegance; known as the “love stone”, rose quartz is the season’s most dazzling way to wear your heart on your sleeve!

Lemon Quartz Jewelry

Take a sneak peek at this sunny sparkler, which turns any blah day into a summer romp!

Blue Quartz Jewelry

Soothing echoes of sea and sky abound in this tranquil gem, glowing with serene beauty that never fails to chase away the blah-style blues.

Shop Quartz Earrings

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Amethyst Earrings

Citrine Earrings

Green Quartz Earrings

Smokey Quartz Earrings

Lemon Quartz Earrings

Rose Quartz Earrings

Blue Quartz Earrings

Shop Quartz Earrings By Material

Gold Quartz Earrings

Sterling Silver Quartz Earrings

Rose Quartz Jewelry

Rose Quartz Jewelry- Blushing Beauty

Romantic and charming, rose quartz jewelry has a sweet vintage charm that can’t be beat- whether showcased in a stunning rose quartz ring, a pair of blushing rose quartz earrings, or a glowing rose quartz pendant, rose quartz’s soft radiance marries the best of vintage beauty and modern style.

Rose quartz jewelry has been prized for centuries for its dreamy depths of color, ranging from the palest of pinks to deep crimsons. Affordable and ranging in style from the bold to the demure, rose quartz jewelry showcases some of nature’s most stunning gifts. Known as the ‘love stone’, rose quartz has long been believed to radiate a gentle, healing energy, promoting emotional healing, inner peace and self-love.

Rose quartz jewelry’s unique affordability and purity of color inspires artisans to create romantic quartz jewelry in an incredible range of styles. Rose quartz jewelry ranges from delicate pink pendants to to bold coral-colored quartz cocktail rings- all blushing beauties! Whether you’re looking for funky modern pieces or sweet classic styles, rose quartz jewelry has an unmatchable glow that never fails to charm and soothe.

Rose Quartz and Pink Jewelry Trends

Jewelry.com: Insider Gems – New Faves

Find out the jewelry styles, the gems and the fashions that’ll be rocking the runways….

Jewelry.com: Pink Jewelry

Expert Advice, Information and Shopping Tips on pink gems. Find out all there is to know about Pink jewelry and find the perfect pink jewelry for you or your loved one.

Jewelry.com: Gems In The House

If you’ve money to spare – you may want to consider some of these ‘furnishings’ such as gold toilets, diamonds in wineglasses and some very unusual uses of gems.

Jewelry.com: Gems A’Singing: Steals Under $100

Sparkling Jewels For Under $100!

Jewelry.com: Tickled Pink – A Wedding to Match the Ring

And the bride wore pink when Ellen and Portia said ‘we do’. A pink dress, pink accessories and a perfect pink diamond engagement ring made this celebrity wedding a rosy affair.

Shop Rose Quartz Jewelry

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Rose Quartz Neckwear

Rose Quartz Earrings

Rose Quartz Rings

Rose Quartz Bracelets

Sapphire: The Jewel of The Sky

Jewelry.com separates the sapphire facts from the fiction in this jewelry primer for September’s glittering birthstone.

Sapphire has been sought after for thousands of years as the ultimate blue gemstone. The ancient Persians believed that the earth rested on a giant sapphire that gave its blue reflection to the sky, hence the Latin name “sapphiru”, which means blue.

The gem has long symbolized faith, remembrance, and enduring commitment. According to tradition, God gave Moses the Ten Commandments on tablets of sapphire, making it the most sacred stone. This supposed “divine favor” is why sapphires often were the gem of choice for kings and high priests throughout history. In fact, the British Crown Jewels contain a number of notable sapphires. Prince Charles even gave Princess Diana a sapphire engagement ring.

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Sapphire is the birthstone for September. It is also the recommended gem for couples celebrating their fifth and 45th wedding anniversaries.

Both sapphire and its sister stone, ruby, are part of the corundum family, one of the strongest minerals on earth. The stone is mined in many parts of the world, including Australia, Cambodia, China, Kashmir, Kenya, Madagascar, Myanmar, Nigeria, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Thailand, the United States and Vietnam. Sapphires from Kashmir and Myanmar are rarest and most prized because of their vivid blue, velvety look.

Although sapphire is virtually synonymous with blue, the stone also comes in a variety of fancy colors that includes colorless/white, pink, yellow, peach, orange, brown, violet, purple, green and many shades in between (except red, because a red sapphire would be called a ruby). Some sapphires that are cut into a cabochon (dome) shape even display a six-rayed white star. These are called star sapphires, and the ancients regarded them as powerful talismans that protected travelers.

Like other gemstones, color is the main determining factor when judging the value of a sapphire. As a rule, the most valuable sapphires have a medium intense, pure vivid blue color and hold the brightness of their color under any type of lighting. Any color undertones – usually black, gray or green – will reduce a stone’s value. Although a pastel stone would be less valued than a deeper blue one, it would be more valuable than a stone considered too dark. In selecting your sapphire, keep in mind that the finest stones are “eye clean”, with little or no inclusions (flaws) visible to the naked eye.

Sapphire is readily available in sizes of up to 2 carats, but gems of 5-10 carats are not unusual. The stone is most often cut in a cushion shape – a rounded rectangle – or an oval. But smaller stones are available in round brilliant cuts and a variety of fancy shapes, such as triangle, square, emerald, marquise, pear, baguette, cabochon and others.

Some of the more noted sapphires include the Logan Sapphire, a 423-carat cushion-cut stone from Sri Lanka currently in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., and a 258-carat stone set in the Russian crown and kept in the Diamond Fund in Moscow.

With a hardness of 9 on the Mohs scale, sapphire is harder than any other gemstone except a diamond. This quality makes it extremely durable for everyday jewelry pieces subject to repeated impact, such as rings and bracelets. In general, sapphire can be cleaned with soapy water or commercial solvent and a brush.

It is estimated that about 90% of sapphires on the market today have been heated to maximize their color and clarity. This process is permanent and completely stable. Perfect natural, untreated gems are exceptionally rare and very expensive. Some colorless or pale stones are treated with chemicals (diffusion treated), which improves the surface color only. This could create a problem if the stone is ever chipped or nicked and needs to be recut or repolished. In addition, some fancy colored sapphire is irradiated to give it a more intense shade. These effects are temporary and can fade in light or heat.

 

Pearl Jewelry 101


From Coco Chanel to Michelle Obama, women have always considered pearl jewelry a must-have addition to their jewelry collections.

Ever wondered how those oysters manage to create such a shiny little miracle? Or what about the five most important factors to consider when buying pearls?

Here is a pearl primer from my sugar momma, Jewelry.com, that tells you all the pearls of wisdom you’ll ever need to know! Enjoy!

Pearl Jewelry 101:

Pearl, the birthstone for June, is among the most timeless, classic and treasured of all gems. Throughout history, pearls have been associated with wisdom, wealth, purity, romance and mystery. The ancient Egyptians were buried with them. In Rome, pearls were considered the ultimate symbol of wealth and status. The Greeks prized them for their beauty and association with love and marriage. Medieval knights wore them in battle as a talisman against injury. And during the Renaissance, some European countries banned all but nobility from the right to wear them.


It’s hard to believe that such a luscious, beautiful gem comes from such humble origins. A natural pearl starts out as a grain of sand or microscopic worm that works its way into an oyster and cannot be expelled. To protect its soft body from this irritant, the oyster secretes a smooth, hard crystalline substance called nacre. Layer upon layer of nacre coats the foreign object and hardens, ultimately forming a pearl. In general, the thicker the nacre, the richer the ‘glow’ of the pearl – which can greatly enhance its value.


Although early pearl gathering depended on divers braving the oceans’ depths to retrieve these treasures, the vast majority of pearls today are grown, or cultured, on pearl farms by surgically inserting a small shell bead, or nucleus, into the mantle of an oyster.

Even though pearls are harvested en masse on pearl farms, producing a quality pearl is an extremely rare event. It is estimated that half of all nucleated oysters do not survive – and of those that do, only 20% bear marketable pearls.

When shopping for pearls, the five factors that determine value are luster (surface brilliance); surface cleanliness (absence of spots, bumps or cracks); shape (generally, the rounder the pearl, the higher its value); color (pearls come in virtually every hue of the rainbow, and a few others, too); and size (the average pearl sold is 7-7.5 millimeters, but these gems can be as small as 1 millimeter or as large as 20 millimeters).

Because pearls are soft, ranking only 2.5-4.5 on the Mohs scale for hardness, they require special care. Natural oils from the skin, as well as hair spray, lotions and cosmetics, can dull their luster. Like other jewelry, they should be cleaned with a soft damp cloth and stored in cloth or cotton away from other jewelry to prevent scratching. Also, avoid allowing your pearl to come in contact with harsh chemicals, which can erode its surface. And if worn frequently, pearl necklaces should be brought to a jeweler once a year for re-stringing to prevent strand breakage.

Ruby Lore – Learn About This Month’s Birthstone

Perhaps no gemstone has been as prized throughout history as the ruby. Celebrated in ancient Sanskrit writings as the most precious of all gemstones, rubies have adorned emperors and kings and inspired countless legends and myths with their rich, fiery hues.

As the ultimate red gemstone, rubies have symbolized passion and romance for centuries. Ruby is the birthstone for July and is also the recommended gem for couples celebrating their 15th and 40th wedding anniversaries.

Also the color of blood, the stone is symbolic of courage and bravery. Warriors were said to have implanted rubies under their skin to bring them valor in battle and make them invincible. The stone has also been used as a talisman against danger, disaster, to stop bleeding, and a number of other ailments. Its intense color was thought to come from an undying flame inside the stone – or, as some legends would have it, a piece of the planet Mars.

Ruby is the red variety of corundum, a sister of sapphire. Like sapphire, ruby rates a “9” on the Mohs scale of hardness, making it the second hardest material known after diamonds.


The most important factor to consider when buying a ruby is its color. It comes in a variety of shades ranging from purplish- and bluish-red to orange-red. Like sapphire, there is also a translucent variety of ruby that can display a six-point star when cut in a smooth domed cabochon cut.


Rubies are rarely found perfect in nature – which is why many are heat-treated to intensify or lighten their color or improve their clarity. Heat enhancement is a permanent, stable process. Some rubies also have surface fractures and cavities that are filled with glass-like materials to improve their appearance.

For both treated or untreated stones, the safest cleaning method is to just use soapy water or a mild commercial solvent and a brush.

The Jewelry Insider

June 1, 2010

Expert Advice, Information and Shopping Tips on dazzling white gold rings. Find out all there is to know about sparkling white gold rings and find the perfect ring style for you or your loved one.

Down through the ages gold has been prized for its rich, yellow color, durability and the wealth that it brings. 24 Karat is pure yellow gold which is considered too soft for the art of jewelry making. In modern jewelry creations, when yellow gold is combined with certain metal alloys, it can be adapted to a range of colors, from white to red to even green. White gold is the product of yellow gold combined with a white metal, usually nickel or palladium. Today’s white gold rings are all the rage on the fashion catwalks including white gold rings for brides and grooms or the combination of white gold rings set with diamonds to create the ultra fashionable Diamond Right Hand Rings.

White gold rings are ideal for jewelry lovers who prefer the look of white metal but don’t want to sacrifice the properties that drew them to gold in the first place. A sleek diamond and white gold ring flashes with a burst of white hot fashion heat, especially with today’s evening wear ensembles of silky gowns and little black dresses.

Like gold jewelry of any color, white gold rings are sold according to their karat weight, or the percentage of pure gold it contains. In addition to changing its color, alloys make the gold stronger. Therefore, white gold rings are sold in 22-, 18-, 14- and 10-karat varieties; the higher the karat quality, the greater proportion of yellow gold the white gold rings will contain.

When nickel is the alloy in white gold rings, a plain simple white gold ring itself is hard and strong, and therefore ideal for resisting damage from active lifestyles or heavy manual work. This makes them ideal for men’s wear and men’s wedding rings. Gold-palladium alloys are soft, pliable and best suited for creating white gold rings with gemstone settings such as the ever-popular Diamond Right Hand Rings or diamond white gold rings for bridal engagements.

Palladium and nickel though do tend to give a slight brown tint to white gold rings. This requires a thin layer of rhodium to maintain the proper color of your white gold rings so today virtually all white gold rings are plated with rhodium.

Ring Around The Finger

When accessorizing for work or play, selecting the correct ring for your fingers is basic to proper adornment. Whether it’s something to compliment an engagement ring or wedding ring ensemble, a piece of fabulousness with one of today’s right hand rings, or a simple ‘gotta have it’ jewel – wrap some style around your fingers.

Learn About Rings

The History, Myths and Traditions of Wedding Bands

From cavemen to cultural norms, discover the secrets, myths and historical gems that make wedding rings – the diamond ring of a lifetime.

Engagement Rings: The Latest Trends

A single diamond solitaire maybe the classic diamond engagement ring style – but today there’s more than just a ‘solitary’ style when it comes to bridal rings. Find out the trends, the styles and the settings that are topping the engagement ring trends for modern brides worldwide.

Insuring And Appraising An Engagement Ring

Should you insure your diamond engagement ring? Is it worth it? How do you do it? What should be aware of? Jewelry.com explains all and more, along with insider tips and advice about insuring and appraising all of your valued jewelry.

Women Put A Ring On It – Engagement Bling for Men

Engagement rings aren’t just for women anymore. More and more ladies are popping the question and putting a ring on their guys for good measure!

Engagement Ring Trends – Avoid The Bachelor Bungle

A jewelry primer of important engagement ring tips every nervous bachelor needs to know.

How To Buy An Engagement Ring

Jewelry.com reveals the codes, the secrets and some insider tips and trends on how to buy an engagement ring. From finding the perfect diamond to getting true value for money – its the 101 of Engagement Ring shopping.

Alternative Engagement Rings

If you’re looking for an engagement ring that’s not quite the ‘norm’, there are some great ring finger alternatives to choose from.

Splurge vs Steal: Valentine’s Special: Right Hand Ringers

Jewelry.com takes a look at the favorite diamond right hand rings of Hollywood’s leading ladies.

Celebrity Rings And Jewelry Ring Trends

Tickled Pink – A Wedding to Match the Ring

And the bride wore pink – diamonds, that is. When Ellen and Portia said ‘we do’ a pink dress, pink accessories and a perfect pink diamond engagement ring made this celebrity wedding a rosy affair.

Celebrities’ Engagement Rings

What are the engagement rings of choice for the rich and the famous? Jewelry.com’s guide to celebrity engagement rings is a journey into some blinding bling.

Celebrity Rings

Mariah Carey’s diamond engagement ring shone in the spotlight as the super-star showed off her multi-million dollar jewel.

Right Hand Rings Rock the Emmys

Diamond divas lit up the Emmys. Celebrities such as Heidi Klum, Eva Longoria, Tiny Fey and Brooke Shields rocked the Emmys’ red-carpet with Right-Hand rings and dazzling diamonds.

Michelle Obama’s Ring – A Diamond and Rhodium ‘Thank You’

President Obama says ‘thank you’ to his First Lady with a diamond ring. As they say, behind every wise man, is an even wiser woman…

The History (As We Tell It) Of Engagement Rings

What’s the story behind engagement rings? From caveman and rope to aristocracy and diamonds – it’s an engaging tale.

Shop White Gold Rings

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White Gold Solitaire Rings

White Gold Fashion Rings

White Gold Anniversary Rings

White Gold Engagement Rings

White Gold Wedding Bands

White Gold Promise Rings

White Gold Enhancer Rings

Shop White Gold Rings By Stone

White Gold No Stone Rings

White Gold Diamond Rings

White Gold Sapphire Rings

White Gold Aquamarine Rings

White Gold Amethyst Rings

White Gold Topaz Rings

White Gold Ruby Rings

White Gold Emerald Rings

The Jewelry Insider

June 1, 2010

Love The Look: Pearl Pendants

Jewelry.Com Is Your Source For Pearl Jewelry Information And Styles. With Expert Shopping Tips, A Perfect Pearl Buying Guide And Insider Tips Finding the Perfect Pearl Pendant And Pearl Jewelry Has Never Been Easier.

When looking for pearl pendants, either for yourself or as a gift, remember pearls come in many sizes, shapes and colors. From pearls in white, pink or black; freshwater, saltwater or cultured; drop style, cluster style or dangling earrings – each pearl has a unique and individual style, but all are graceful and luxurious

Pearls- are the recommended gift for couples celebrating their third and 30th wedding anniversaries as well as being the June birthstone. If you’re celebrating June birthday – there’s no better gift than a precious pink pearl pendant or a glamorous gold pearl cluster necklace. Looking for something different and affordable, try a glittering gray pearl drop or a stunning black pearl and diamond jewel.

It is interesting to note that pearls are the only gem that grows naturally in a living organism. This makes them a unique creation, and dictates many different criteria for grading a pearl. Pearl jewelry is graded by size, color, shape, luster, surface quality, nacre quality and matching – the latter is especially significant when it comes to pearl pendants.

When you browse around our wide selection of beautiful pearl pendants keep in mind that since each pearl is a unique creation, each pearl pendant is also one of a kind. So when you find the one that was meant for you – don’t hesitate you’re your pearl after all, is as unique as you are!

Learn about Pearl Pendants

Jewelry.com, Pearl Jewelry

Expert advice, information and tips on how to care for pearl jewelry. Find out all there is to know about pearls and find the perfect pearl jewel for you or your loved one.

Jewelry Pendants

Expert Advice, Information and Shopping Tips on choosing the perfect pendant. From golden charms, diamond hearts, sparkling animals and gemstone beauties – discover a dazzling array of pendants for every style, occasion and budget.

Jewelry.com Bridal Tips: And The Bride Wore Pearls

Find out why pearls are perfect for any bride.

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Let our experts help you choose the perfect Mother’s Day gift.

June Is Pearl Month

Jewelry.com gives you a pearl primer about June’s classic birthstone.

Jewelry.com: Steamed Clams And A Purple Pearl

Next time you order clams, careful how you open them – there may be a purple pearl hidden inside.

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